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FinCEN的新规则即将永远消除我们金融体系中的贫困人口(谷歌翻译)

Kraken 2020-12-29 01:20 相关类型 其它

金融犯罪执法网络(FinCEN)的规则已经禁止金融机构为没有实际邮寄地址的无家可归者,无住房者和难民人口开设账户。现在,FinCEN提出了一条新规则,该规则将禁止那些幸运的,即使这些钱是虚拟货币,也无法向他们汇款。

该规则还将禁止金融机构向旨在消除最初负责金融排斥的昂贵中间商的智能合约汇款。更糟糕的是,FinCEN试图在假期期间将规则纳入法律,只给公众15天的时间来回应。该规则本身永远将我们的金融系统与最需要它的人隔离开来,缩短公众意见征询过程会削弱美国人对FinCEN的信心。

周五下午晚些时候,FinCEN显然是在即将卸任的财政部长的个人指导下,发布了拟议的规则,为金融机构提出了新的报告要求。拟议的规则在几个方面都存在问题,但有一个方面与众不同:它将要求希望将虚拟货币从其金融机构发送给收款人的客户报告收款人的姓名和实际地址。如果客户无法报告收件人的地址,则金融机构必须拒绝该交易。

FinCEN试图通过将其比作古老的货币交易报告(CTR)来证明该规则的合理性,该报告已将数十年应用于现金和硬币(纸和金属)交易。点击率的历史学家了解得更多。

可以肯定的是,CTR长期以来一直要求金融机构向FinCEN报告其自身客户的信息,但是CTR从未要求报告有关收款人的信息。尽管如此,FinCEN仍然感到困惑,认为拟议规则“与现有要求一致”。

目前,美国有25%的人口没有银行服务或资金不足。遗憾的是,现有要求确实确实禁止金融机构为这25%的无家可归者,难民和其他人开设账户,而这些人没有足够的钱来支付邮寄地址。

但是,现有要求确实允许他们从有能力支付帐户维护费并住在吸引实体分支机构的社区中获得收入的人。拟议的规则将超越现有要求,从字面上取缔使用金融机构向较不幸的人汇款的人。

拟议的规则不仅为富人保留了当今的金融体系。它还试图与穷人隔离明天的金融体系。除了仅禁止与没有家庭住址的人进行交易外,提议的规则还将禁止金融机构将虚拟货币发送给没有名字或地理位置的智能合约。

智能合约是一种快速发展的技术,专门用于消除对风险高昂的中间商的需求。使用这些中间商的需要使穷人脱离了当今的金融体系。拟议中的规则将阻止该技术的资源流,确保明天的金融系统与今天的金融系统一样具有排他性。

法律要求FinCEN向公众询问我们对拟议规则的看法,并给我们足够的时间作出有意义的回应。政府几乎总是给我们至少30天的时间,而对于重要事务,通常会给我们60天甚至更长的时间。

取而代之的是,为了在最少的公共投入下干预该规则,FinCEN在假期期间仅提供15天供公众考虑该规则的后果,即使他们知道该规则很容易受到挑战。这是史无前例的,并且显然不适当地如此地背离现行法律。

Kraken会努力阻止这种情况。你可以帮忙。在此处阅读拟议规则制定通知,并尽快提交回复。我们也将提交我们的。

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FinCEN’s New Rule Is About to Wall Off the Poor from Our Financial System Forever

The Financial Crime Enforcement Network’s (FinCEN) rules already prohibit financial institutions from opening accounts for homeless, unhoused and refugee populations who don’t have physical mailing addresses. Now, FinCEN has proposed a new rule that would prohibit those who are fortunate enough to have accounts from even sending money to these people, if that money is a virtual currency.

The rule would also prohibit financial institutions from sending money to smart contracts designed to eliminate the costly middlemen responsible for financial exclusion to begin with. Worse yet, FinCEN is trying to sneak the rule into law over the holiday season, giving the public only 15 days to respond. The rule itself forever walls off our financial system from those who need it most, and short circuiting the public comment process erodes the confidence Americans have placed in FinCEN.

Late Friday afternoon, apparently at the personal direction of the outgoing Treasury Secretary, FinCEN rushed to publish a proposed rule creating a new reporting requirement for financial institutions. The proposed rule is problematic in several respects, but one stands out from the rest: It would require customers who wish to send virtual currency from their financial institution to a recipient to report the name and physical address of the recipient. If the customer cannot report the recipient’s address, the financial institution must reject the transaction.

FinCEN tries to justify this rule by likening it to the venerable Currency Transaction Report (CTR), which has applied to cash and coin (paper and metal) transactions for decades. Historians of the CTR know better.

To be sure, the CTR has long required financial institutions to report their own customer’s information to FinCEN, but the CTR has never required reporting information about the recipient. In spite of this, FinCEN takes the baffling position that the proposed rule is “consistent with existing requirements.”

Twenty-five percent of the U.S. population is currently unbanked or underbanked. Sadly, existing requirements do indeed prohibit financial institutions from opening accounts for homeless people, refugees and others in this 25% who do not have enough money to afford a mailing address.

Existing requirements do, however, permit them to receive money from those who can afford to pay account maintenance fees and live in neighborhoods that attract physical branches. The proposed rule would go beyond existing requirements to literally outlaw people sending money to the less fortunate using their financial institutions.

The proposed rule does not just reserve today’s financial system for the wealthy. It also seeks to wall off tomorrow’s financial system from the poor. Beyond just prohibiting transactions with humans without home addresses, the proposed rule would prohibit financial institutions from sending virtual currency to smart contracts, which have no name or physical location to begin with.

Smart contracts are a swiftly-advancing technology created specifically to eliminate the need for risky, expensive middlemen. The need to use these middlemen is what keeps the poor out of today’s financial system. The proposed rule would choke the flow of resources to this technology, ensuring that tomorrow’s financial system will be just as exclusionary as today’s.

FinCEN is required by law to ask the public what we think about the proposed rule, and to give us enough time for a meaningful response. The government almost always gives us at least 30 days to do so, and oftentimes 60 days or even longer for important matters.

Instead, in order to jam through this rule with minimal public input, FinCEN is providing only 15 days over the holiday season for the public to consider the rule’s consequences, even though they know it is vulnerable to challenge. This is unprecedented, and patently in appropriate for such a dramatic departure from existing law.

Kraken will fight to stop this. You can help. Read the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking here and submit a response as soon as you can. We will be submitting ours, too.

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